Olympic flame to start its journey

News

Naval fliers to get the Olympic flame going on its epic journey
12 May 2012

Aviators of 771 Naval Air Squadron will carry the Olympic flame on its first journey in the British Isles when it arrives in the UK next weekend.

Four fliers and their Sea King have the task of flying the symbol of the Games from RNAS Culdrose to Land’s End on Saturday morning to begin its epic relay around Britain.

Pictures: PO(Phot) Paul A’Barrow and LA(Phot) Dave Sterratt, RNAS Culdrose

STRIDING away from their distinctive red and grey helicopter, these are the four Royal Navy aviators who will set the Olympic flame off on its historic journey around the UK in seven days’ time.

Pilots Lt Cdr Martin Shepherd and Lt Chris Whittington, observer Lt Cdr Richard Full and aircrewman Cpl Justin Morgan RM of 771 Naval Air Squadron have the momentous task of delivering the abiding symbol of the Olympics to Land’s End from where it will begin an 8,000-mile journey around the UK before igniting the flame in London’s Olympic Stadium on the evening of July 27.

The flame, which was ignited by the rays of the sun in a traditional ceremony in Greece on Thursday at the Temple of Hera in Olympia where the ancients once toiled, and is currently being carried around the Peloponnese, is due to arrive at RNAS Culdrose on Friday night.

After an overnight stay at the Cornish air station, the flame will be flown to Land’s End by the 771 team in their Sea King early on Saturday morning.

Lt Cdr Richard Full, the man charged with delivering the Olympic flame, leans out of the side door of his Sea King

On landing, Lt Cdr Full will jump out of the aircraft and take the flame to the start of the torch relay at the westernmost point on the mainland, where it will light the Olympic torch and three-times gold medalist Ben Ainslie will begin the relay.

The flame will then travel 8,000 miles across the UK – passing within ten miles of 19 in every 20 of the nation’s 62 million inhabitants.

Some 8,000 torchbearers will carry it for approximately 300 metres each, passing the flame from torch to torch until it reaches the stadium for the opening of the Games.

“This is most definitely a ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ opportunity as I doubt whether I, or many of my fellow West Country men and women, will see the Olympic Flame pass through their towns and villages again during their lifetimes,” said 43-year-old Lt Cdr Full from Totnes in Devon.

“As an avid sportsman and a firm believer in the ethos of the Olympic Games, I am extremely proud and honoured to be invited to carry the Olympic flame on its short journey from one of our Search and Rescuer aircraft to the starting point for London 2012.”

771 NAS’ Commanding Officer Lt Cdr Martin Shepherd at the controls of the red and grey Sea King

As the Olympic flame is classified as a symbolic flame it is permitted to be carried on board an aircraft following special authorisation from the Civil Aviation Authority.

The flame will travel in a ceremonial lantern that is secured in a specially designed cradle which is, in turn, firmly fixed to its seat on the helicopter using a secure holding device.  The lantern has been designed so the flame can burn safely for the duration of the journey.

It’s due to arrive at Culdrose between 6.30 and 7.30pm on Friday aboard a British Airways, gold-liveried Airbus, ‘BA2012’, flying in from Athens.

Capt William Entwisle, Culdrose’s Commanding Officer said: “We are honoured to be able to help the Olympic flame at the start of its very special journey around the United Kingdom.

“Our personnel – be they part of the Search and Rescue Squadron who will be giving the Olympic Flame a ‘lift’, those training for front-line operations or even those who are currently supporting the Royal Navy across the globe – are very proud that our Air Station has been chosen to play a part in the build up to the London 2012 Olympic Games.

“We are delighted to be playing such an important role in this once-in-a-lifetime event.”

Observer Lt Cdr Full studies the radar picture in the back of the Sea King

Lord Coe, chairman of London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games, added: “It is a fitting tribute to the hard work and bravery of the Search and Rescue Squadron at Culdrose that they have been chosen to carry the Olympic flame to Land’s End for the start of the London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay. The arrival by Sea King helicopter will be the first of many alternative modes of transport which will be used to carry the Flame as it makes its 70 day journey around the UK.”

The flame’s arrival at Culdrose as well as its 20-mile flight to Land’s End for the lighting of the torch is due to be broadcast live by the BBC.

HMS Bulwark’s crew blag their way across Blighty in flagship’s mad challenge

News

Bulwark’s crew blag their way across Blighty in flagship’s mad challenge
11 May 2012

Six sailors and marines from the nation’s flagship were dumped in a remote bay in Scotland and ordered by their captain to rejoin HMS Bulwark 550 miles away.

In the latest challenge set by the assault ship’s captain, the team secured free travel, free food, free accommodation and even met Royalty during their dash from Stranraer to Weymouth via London.

Capt Burton reads out the challenge to (l-r) CPO Lawson, AB Rogers, Wtr Tough, LA Callow and Cpl Lancaster on the flagship’s bridge. Pictures: LA(Phot) Martin Carney, HMS Bulwark

SIX sailors and marines from the nation’s flagship completed a 550-mile odyssey from south-west Scotland to London and finally back to their ship in Weymouth with just the gift of the gab and their uniforms to help them on their way.

With just five minutes notice for challenge, the men and women from HMS Bulwark were summoned to the assault ship’s bridge, told they would be dumped ashore near Stranraer and would have to use their initiative to rejoin the warship a few days later in time for Olympic security training off the Dorset coast.

With the ship in Luce Bay completing her part in the biggest military exercise of the year, Marine engineer CPO Lou Lawson, aircraft handler LA Clare Callow, Royal Marine Cpl Richard ‘Banjo’ Lancaster, Wtr Michaela Tough and AB Paul ‘Buck’ Rogers rocked up and, as the event should be recorded for posterity, Bulwark’s photographer LA Martin ‘Chilli’ Carney was asked to join them.

The adventurers are put ashore in Luce Bay by landing craft

The previous ‘mad challenge’ set five Bulwarkers the task of getting from the tip of Scotland to Faslane sans money and appear in the media, tour a distillery, play the bagpipes and generally blag a lot.

This time the flagship’s Commanding Officer Capt Alex Burton set the sextet the task of getting from Galloway to Weymouth to meet the ship for her Olympic security training exercise without the use of money.

Simples.

For added ‘fun’, the captain decided they must visit each Olympic aquatic venue including the Water Polo Arena, Eton-Dorney, Lee Valley White Water Centre and Weymouth and Portland.

Durham Mayor Cllr Les Thomson greets Banjo as the six arrive in Bulwark’s affiliated city

To make it even more interesting the challengers had to meet the Bishop, council chairman and Mayor of Durham, visit Durham Trinity School and Trinity House London, plug the ship on a TV show, meet a living Olympian and, before rejoining the flagship, produce a suitable commemorative photograph for HM The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.

Anyway, back to Luce Bay…

Once ashore, the six decided the first stop, once they’d orientated themselves, should be the pub – to hatch a plan, obviously.

The adventurers pose with a friendly train guard on a Grand Central train down to London

That plan involved hitching to Stranraer… and then heading for the pub for more plan hatching…

In Stranraer, CPO Lawson persuaded railway staff to give free tickets to Edinburgh, where the team tried (and failed) to get a free night’s stay in a five-star hotel… but did stay in a hostel for £13.

Semi-refreshed, the next morning they blagged more free travel as far as Durham, where they were met off the train by the mayor. The city’s bishop was away, but his dean obliged, as did the staff of Durham’s Trinity School who sorted out free fish and chips and a free night in a luxury hotel.

Next stop London. Except the guard on the train south wasn’t quite as accommodating as predecessors in Scotland and booted the challengers off in Northallerton.

LA Callow and Wtr Tough grab 40 winks on the train

Luckily staff on the next train to York didn’t check tickets… and once in the historic city another train company was happy to provide free onward travel to the capital (and free cuppas all the way too).

Folk in the capital were just as helpful. CPO Lawson once again proved he had a silvery tongue and sorted out two free nights at the Union Jack Club.

In London, the team accomplished all their goals bar one (appearing on the telly). They did, however, trump the ‘meet a living Olympian’ by meeting a living Olympian… and Royal to boot when they attended an event at Trinity House with Princess Anne (she rode with the equestrian team at the 1976 games in Montreal).

The team meet Princess Anne at Trinity House in London

A bit more blagging (and a few more trips to the pub) and the six were back aboard Bulwark off Weymouth in time for the ship’s high-profile Olympic security exercise.

“The Navy often presents its personnel with challenging situations where wits and sharp thinking are key to resolving them. This one caught us all by surprise,” said Chilli.

“It tested our mettle and resourcefulness to the max. At times, the stress of certain situations showed as patience wore thin and voices became raised.

“But that professionalism which is instilled within us from the early stages of basic training prevailed and our personal differences would be quickly forgotten as we worked hard together to deal with the job in hand.”

Which is probably exactly what Capt Burton and his team want to hear.

Blagging a couple of free nights at the Union Jack Club

“This type of challenge tests these young sailors and marines’ initiative and resourcefulness whilst allowing them to apply their leadership and management training in an arena outside their normal sphere of operations,” says Bulwark’s Executive Officer Cdr Kevin Rowlands.

“The London 2012 motto is ‘inspire a generation’ and hopefully these sailors and marines will gain from their experience and inspire those that they lead.”

English class

English class

You don’t need to be a word whiz to learn English. All you need is passion.

Remember: if you don’t like it, you won’t learn it!

So here are five cool ways to learn better English that you’re sure to enjoy.

1. Listen to English-language music that you love.

The more music you listen to in English, the more vocabulary – and a good command of the accent – you’re bound to pick up. Not to mention that, with songs you enjoy, you’ll be motivated to find out what all the lyrics mean. This will inevitably bring you to a dictionary or an online translator. Take your time to put all the lyrics together and figure out what the singer is trying to say. This is also a great way to learn how native English speakers communicate casually and in everyday life, as the emotions relayed in pop songs can’t be found in textbooks or the news.


2. Go to fun expat events after work or school.

From trivia nights to informative presentations, Phnom Penh is full of native English-speaking expats taking the helm at events for anyone to take part in. Good examples include Monday night’s Nerd Night, where the audience can listen to a presentation and ask questions over a relaxing drink; or Drinks by Design, a Wednesday-night networking event for young professionals from all over the city. In social situations like these, you’ll definitely be approached by others – so you’ll have the chance to practise your English and learn from them. And don’t forget, these events are tonnes of good fun!


3. Watch English-language movies while out with your friends.

With The Flicks 1 and 2, it’s a cinch to catch an awesome English-language film any time of day or night. Movies are a great, easy and relaxing way to soak up vocabulary and a good accent while still enjoying your time. Make sure to take some friends with you – that way, you can ask one another questions about what’s being said and help each other out. You could try the Cineplex, but with the huge audience it’s hard to discuss what’s going on. It’s a much better idea to stick with small movie houses so you can concentrate better and remain carefree about keeping up a quiet discussion with your buddies.


4. Start blogging and using social media.

Social media may sound tough or technical, but we all know that Facebook is simple to use when it comes to our personal lives. So, what should you do? Start Facebooking in English – your friends will love it, and will join you. And with a blog – such as Blogspot or WordPress – you can keep an online journal of your experiences to share with your friends. Maybe you want to review restaurants, music or movies – whatever you like, start blogging in English and share it! For the more daring, give Twitter a try. Keep your friends updated with your quick English on the fly, but remember that you have to keep it to 140 characters.


5. Help out your community with English-speakers.

LIFT, Loy9 and TEDxPP all offer fantastic platforms for you to share your views on youth culture and help out other young Cambodians – while working in English. With LIFT, you can write in English; with Loy9, you can be heard. With TEDxPP, there are myriad events to both take part in and listen to, from now until the end of summer. Whether your preference is art, literature or community service, all these organisations offer a unique chance to meet others, learn from others – and, of course, develop your English skills.


Want to contact Justin for more information? Send an email tojustin.heifetz@phnompenhpost.com

 

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Learn about Koala’s

Koalas at risk in Australia (1st May, 2012)

Many of Australia’s koalas are at risk and need to be protected. The country’s spokesman for the environment Tony Burke told reporters that he would protect koala populations in the states of Queensland and New South Wales, and in areas around the capital Canberra. Koala lovers are very happy with this new decision. A top koala expert, Professor Alistair Melzer, said it was “a big step forward”. However, he believes the country needs to do more to help koalas from attacks by dogs and being hit by cars.

Mr Burke said his decision to help the koala was because of a three-year study that looked at koala numbers and the dangers they faced. He explained: “People have made it very clear to me that they want to make sure the koala is protected for future generations.” He said his actions alone might not be enough to save the koalas. He added: “Koala numbers vary significantly across the country, so while koala populations are clearly declining in some areas, there are large, stable or even increasing populations in other areas.”

PHRASE MATCH

Match the following phrases from the article.

Paragraph 1

1.

at risk and need to

a.

the environment

2

The country’s spokesman for

b.

are very happy

3.

protect koala

c.

forward

4.

Koala lovers

d.

be protected

5.

a big step

e.

by cars

6.

being hit

f.

populations

 

Paragraph 2

1.

his decision to

a.

faced

2

the dangers they

b.

the koalas

3.

protected for future

c.

help the koala

4.

might not be enough to save

d.

declining

5.

vary

e.

generations

6.

populations are clearly

f.

significantly


 

LISTENING GAP FILL

 

Many of Australia’s koalas are at risk and need ______________. The country’s _________________ environment Tony Burke told reporters that he would protect koala _________________ states of Queensland and New South Wales, and in areas around the capital Canberra. _________________ very happy with this new decision. A _________________, Professor Alistair Melzer, said it was “a big step forward”. However, he believes the country needs to do more to help koalas from attacks by dogs _________________ cars.

Mr Burke said his decision to help the koala was because of a _________________ that looked at koala numbers and the _________________. He explained “People have made it very _________________ they want to make sure the koala is protected for future generations.” He said _________________ might not be enough to save the koalas. He added: “Koala numbers _________________ across the country, so while koala populations are clearly declining in some areas, there are large, stable or even increasing populations _________________.”


 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

Many of Australia’s koalas are at risk and need to (1) ____ protected. The country’s spokesman (2) ____ the environment Tony Burke told reporters that he would protect koala populations in the states (3) ____ Queensland and New South Wales, and in areas around the (4) ____ Canberra. Koala lovers are very happy with this new decision. A (5) ____ koala expert, Professor Alistair Melzer, said it was “a big step forward”. However, he believes the country needs to do more to help koalas from (6) ____ by dogs and being hit by cars.

Mr Burke said his (7) ____ to help the koala was because of a three-year study that looked at koala numbers and the dangers they (8) ____. He explained “People have made it very clear to me that they want to make sure the koala is protected for (9) ____ generations.” He said his actions alone might not be enough to (10) ____ the koalas. He added: “Koala numbers (11) ____ significantly across the country, so while koala populations are clearly declining in some areas, there are large, (12) ____ or even increasing populations in other areas.”

Put the correct words from this table into the article.

1.

(a)

do

(b)

be

(c)

have

2.

(a)

at

(b)

by

(c)

for

3.

(a)

at

(b)

of

(c)

up

4.

(a)

capital

(b)

lower case

(c)

letters

5.

(a)

bottom

(b)

middle

(c)

top

6.

(a)

attacks

(b)

muggings

(c)

beatings

7.

(a)

decide

(b)

decision

(c)

decider

8.

(a)

nosed

(b)

headed

(c)

faced

9.

(a)

future

(b)

past

(c)

perfect

10.

(a)

pave

(b)

wave

(c)

save

11.

(a)

vary

(b)

every

(c)

very

12

(a)

tables

(b)

stable

(c)

stubble


 

SPELLING

 

Spell the jumbled words (from the text) correctly.

Paragraph 1

1.

need to be ttereocpd

2.

eaknsmops for the environment

3.

around the aiacplt Canberra

4.

happy with this new ndseoiic

5.

a big step afdrowr

6.

kcaatts by dogs

 

Paragraph 2

7.

the ernsagd they faced

8.

People have made it very eacrl

9.

eufrut generations

10.

be gehnuo to save the koalas

11.

populations are lrleayc declining

12.

in other rsaea


 

PUT THE TEXT BACK TOGETHER

 

Number these lines in the correct order. 

(    )

Mr Burke said his decision to help the koala was because of a three-year study that

(    )

the capital Canberra. Koala lovers are very happy with this new decision. A top koala

(    )

made it very clear to me that they want to make sure the koala is protected for future

(    )

looked at koala numbers and the dangers they faced. He explained “People have

(    )

expert, Professor Alistair Melzer, said it was “a big step forward”. However, he believes

(    )

the country needs to do more to help koalas from attacks by dogs and being hit by cars.

(  1  )

Many of Australia’s koalas are at risk and need to be protected. The country’s

(    )

generations.” He said his actions alone might not be enough to save

(    )

spokesman for the environment Tony Burke told reporters that he would protect koala

(    )

populations in the states of Queensland and New South Wales, and in areas around

(    )

clearly declining in some areas, there are large, stable or even increasing populations in other areas.”

(    )

the koalas. He added: “Koala numbers vary significantly across the country, so while koala populations are


 

THE READING / TAPESCRIPT

 

With a partner, put the words back into the correct order. 

1.

be     risk     protected     and     Koalas     need     are     to     at.

2.

areas     the     Canberra     In     around     capital.    

3.

lovers     happy    new    Koala     very     this     are     with     decision.    

4.

country     needs     He     to     believes     do     the     more.    

5.

by     koalas     attacks     dogs     Help     from.    

6.

study     that    looked    at    koala    numbers    A    three    –    year.    

7.

sure     protected     Make     is     koala     .     the

8.

be     not     might     alone     actions     His     enough.    

9.

areas     some     in     declining     clearly     are     Populations.    

10.

populations     increasing     even     or     stable     ,     Large.    


 

DISCUSSION (Write your own questions)

STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

1.

________________________________________________________

2.

________________________________________________________

3.

________________________________________________________

4.

________________________________________________________

5.

________________________________________________________

6.

________________________________________________________

——————————————————————————

STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

1.

________________________________________________________

2.

________________________________________________________

3.

________________________________________________________

4.

________________________________________________________

5.

________________________________________________________

6.

________________________________________________________


 

WRITING

 

Write about koalas for 10 minutes. Show your partner your paper. Correct each other’s work.

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________


HOMEWORK

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google’s search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. KOALAS: Search the Internet and find more information about koalas. Talk about what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.

3. MAGAZINE ARTICLE: Write a magazine article about koalas and their falling numbers. Include an imaginary interview with a koala in danger. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.

4. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Write a newspaper article about the next stage in this news story. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.

5. LETTER: Write a letter to a koala expert. Ask him/her three questions about koalas. Give him/her three of your opinions on them. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Your partner will answer the questions you asked.

 

Improve your English!

mprove your English! Practise more verb patterns.

Hi again guys,

So today of course we’re going to look again at English verb patterns- today we’re going to make them a little bit trickier.

Fill in the gaps with a word, 2 words or a phrase.

Questions

  1. I recommend ________(go) to the ballet.
  2. We were persuaded ________(employ) the young man, despite his age.
  3. Teachers don’t usually allow their students________(use) dictionaries.
  4. I’m dreaming ________ a white Christmas.
  5. They suggested __________(I go) to see the tutor.
  6. I think you should apologise__________(shout) at him.
  7. Criminals who reoffend should be punished __________(put) in jail.
  8. He made me _______(go out) in to the rain.
  9. They accused the girl ____________( take) the biscuits without asking.
  10. They should be discouraged _________( smoke).
  11. I’ll always remember ________(look) at that beautiful landscape.
  12. He apologises. He regrets ________(hurt) you.
  13. I _________(see) him pick up the book and rip it up.
  14. They aren’t very used to _______(get up) so early.
  15. They appeared ________(be) enjoying themselves.
  16. They saw them __________(dance) for a bit.
  17. He begged ___________( be allowed) in to they party but they refused.

Answers

  1. I recommend __going___to the ballet.
  2. We were persuaded ___to employ_____ the young man, despite his age.
  3. Teachers don’t usually allow their students___to use_____dictionaries.
  4. I’m dreaming ___of____ a white Christmas.
  5. They suggested ____I went______to see the tutor.
  6. I think you should apologise____for shouting______ at him.
  7. Criminals who reoffend should be punished ___by  being put___ in jail.
  8. He made me _go out___in to the rain.
  9. They accused the girl ____of taking____ the biscuits without asking.
  10. They should be discouraged _from smoking____.
  11. I’ll always remember __looking __ at that beautiful landscape.
  12. He apologises. He regrets _hurting___ you.
  13. I __saw____ him pick up the book and rip it up.
  14. They aren’t very used to _getting up__ so early.
  15. They appeared __to be___ enjoying themselves.
  16. They saw them ___dancing___ for a bit.
  17. He begged __to be allowed___ in to their party but they refused.

Well done! Most of these verbs just need to be learnt. No pain no gain.

See you soon and good luck with your English.

Click here to enrol in English courses in London.

So You Want to Learn English!?

So You Want to Learn English!?

If you’re new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting!

Good day,

Not long ago I got an email in my inbox from this education company about an infographic they made on learning English. As you know I’m in C. America and would like to learn Spanish. Currently I’m on a Caribbean Island and everyone speaks English so naturally, have made little progress. Not a day goes by where I don’t at some point realize how lucky I am to speak English. It’s without a doubt the official language of business and travel, not to mention a huge audience online if you ever choose to blog…


Infographic: How to learn Englishvia Kaplan Blog

As such, I decided to write how I’d learn English if it wasn’t my mother t0ngue. Before we begin will mention I’ve always been slightly envious of those who speak English as a second language because when they travel, they have a secret language they can communicate with friends when making tough decisions. As I already mentioned, most people you’ll meet traveling will speak a bit of English.

So let us begin, if I wanted to speak English the first thing I’d do is fly to central North America or anywhere in Australia or New Zealand. The reason I pick these locations is because English is the national language and since they are somewhat isolated from the rest of the world, it’s almost all English. Sure there are other languages being spoken but it’s predominantly English and you’d need a bit just to get by. The need to speak English would be the catalyst to continue learning more and from there the stage would be set to finally finish as a fluent English speaker.

Something I found interesting regarding the infographic is that 36% of respondents said they would go to the United Kingdom to learn English. Sure going to England to learn English makes sense at first glance but upon further inspection, believe it would be a mistake. England is too multicultural and small, wherever you went you’d probably be able to find huge pockets of people that speak your language making it easier to follow the path of least resistance and sabotage your language learning mission.

If traveling is not an option for you, believe the next best bet is to watch your favorite movies in English. The reason you watch movies you’re familiar with is that you already know the plot and know what people are talking about. As a result, you’ll often hear certain words, terms and phrases used that you can begin to associate with certain activities, locations and objects. Believe the visual component would assist most people and once you got a grasp on the language via movies, go straight to listening to music. It’s no surprise that roughly 80% of people surveyed agreed that both movies and music are great tools to learn English.

Naturally, these principals would work for any language, may have to start watching some Spanish television…

Good luck!

Tips hat,

P.S: It’s Saturday, go make the most of it regardless of your schedule.