Word of the Day | witticism

Word of the Day | witticism

witticism •\ˈwi-tə-ˌsi-zəm\• noun

: a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill has the power to evoke laughter

Word of the Day | witticism

via Blogger http://jcsielts.blogspot.com/2013/10/word-of-day-witticism.html

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Word of the Day | witticism – added by John Currin – See more posts here – click here

Word of the Day | witticism

witticism •\ˈwi-tə-ˌsi-zəm\• noun

: a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill has the power to evoke laughter

– added by John Currin – See more posts here – click here

The bare bones

The bare bones

Skeletons in the Sculpture Park, Chelsea Flower Show, London

Skeletons at the Sculpture Park during preparations for the Chelsea Flower Show in London. Photo: Lewis Whyld / PA Wire

Today’s Phrase

The bare bones of something are the basics, the essential parts of it.

Examples:

The house was stripped to the bare bones after the tornado. All you could see were the walls and parts of the roof.

So far, you’ve only given me the bare bones of what happened. I need more details to fill the report form out properly.

 

Take note

When you say something is close to the bone, it means it is very personal or something that makes someone feel uncomfortable because it is the truth.

Example:

You shouldn’t talk about marriage when Mary is around. It’s too close to the bone. She has just left her husband.

Interesting fact

The adult human skeleton is made of 206 bones. The thighbone, called the femur, is the longest, largest and strongest bone in the body. Simple bone fractures (breaks) usually take about 6-8 weeks to heal, although larger or older bones take longer.

The bare bones

via Blogger http://jcsielts.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-bare-bones.html

Word of the Day | pitfall

Word of the Day | pitfall

pitfall •\ˈpit-ˌfȯl\• noun

1. an unforeseen or unexpected or surprising difficulty
2. a trap in the form of a concealed hole

Word of the Day | pitfall

via Blogger http://jcsielts.blogspot.com/2013/10/word-of-day-pitfall.html

Confusing Words: Being and Been

Confusing Words: Being and Been

 

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The words ‘being’ and ‘been’ are sometimes confused. As a rule the word ‘been’ is always used after ‘have’ whereas ‘being’ is never used after ‘have’. It is used after ‘be’.

‘Been’ is the past participle of the verb ‘be’ and is usually used with the perfect aspect with ‘have’ in all its forms i.e. had and has

I have been busy. NOT I have being busy.

‘being’ is the present participle of the verb ‘be’ and can be used with the continuous form of the verb ‘be’ is all its forms i.e. am, is, was, are and were.
When I arrived at the scene of the accident the victim was being placed in an ambulance.

I don’t know why but John is being really difficult today.

Being as a noun

The word ‘being’ can also be used as a noun.
A human being.

Being as a gerund

The word ‘being’ can be used as a gerund which is a type of noun.
Do all actors like being famous?

His being clumsy caused the accident.

Lesson by Tristan, teacher at EC Malta English school

Now complete the following using the correct form of been or being:

  • 1. You have _ very helpful this week.
    being
    been

  • 2. The children have not _ naughty.
    being
    been

  • 3. The film is _ shown in 3D in all cinemas.
    been
    being

  • 4. All Sarah’s paintings are _ sold
    being
    been

  • 5. Peter is _ accused of stealing office stationery.
    been
    being

  • 6. I think alcohol may have _ a factor in increased aggression among teenagers.
    been
    being

 

Confusing Words: Being and Been

via Blogger http://jcsielts.blogspot.com/2013/10/confusing-words-being-and-been.html

The bare bones – added by John Currin – See more posts here – click here

The bare bones

Skeletons in the Sculpture Park, Chelsea Flower Show, London

Skeletons at the Sculpture Park during preparations for the Chelsea Flower Show in London. Photo: Lewis Whyld / PA Wire

Today’s Phrase

The bare bones of something are the basics, the essential parts of it.

Examples:

The house was stripped to the bare bones after the tornado. All you could see were the walls and parts of the roof.

So far, you’ve only given me the bare bones of what happened. I need more details to fill the report form out properly.

 

Take note

When you say something is close to the bone, it means it is very personal or something that makes someone feel uncomfortable because it is the truth.

Example:

You shouldn’t talk about marriage when Mary is around. It’s too close to the bone. She has just left her husband.

Interesting fact

The adult human skeleton is made of 206 bones. The thighbone, called the femur, is the longest, largest and strongest bone in the body. Simple bone fractures (breaks) usually take about 6-8 weeks to heal, although larger or older bones take longer.

– added by John Currin – See more posts here – click here

Word of the Day | pitfall – added by John Currin – See more posts here – click here

Word of the Day | pitfall

pitfall •\ˈpit-ˌfȯl\• noun

1. an unforeseen or unexpected or surprising difficulty
2. a trap in the form of a concealed hole

– added by John Currin – See more posts here – click here