IELTS test in Australia – September 2013 (General Training)

 

An IELTS test taker from Australia (thank you N!) shared this exam update. N didn’t remember the Listening and Reading, but did a good job with Writing and Speaking:

Writing testIELTS test in Australia

Writing task 1 (a letter)

Write a letter to your landlord about the neighbours above your flat that are disturbing and say that you wish to make a complaint.

Writing Task 2 (an essay)

There are people who like to spend time with their own age group and people that spend their time with different age groups. What approach is better in your opinion? Give relevant examples from your own experience.

Speaking test

Interview

– What is your full name?
– Can I see your ID?
– Where are you from?
– Do you work or study?
– Do you receive gifts frequently?
– Do like to receive them? Why?
– What is the most precious gift you have received so far?
– Why do you like it so much?

 

Cue Card

Describe a shopping street that you would like to visit. Please say

– Where is it?
– Why would you like to go there?
– Whom would you take there with you?

Discussion

– Do you use the Internet for shopping?
– What are the pros and cons of Internet shopping?
– Will you continue to shop online in the future?

 

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Of and From

Of and From

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Many learners of English find it difficult to know when to use ‘of’ and when to use ‘from’ in English. This is probably because in their languages the same preposition is used for both.

Of

‘of’ for possession

We use ‘s for living things, groups and institutions. For inanimate objects we use ‘of’
‘s – Tom’s cat. 
Of – The title of the film – the name of the game.

‘Of’ is used in certain expressions: 
It’s (nice/good/kind/generous/stupid etc.) of (somebody) to do (something) 
It was kind of Mark to help us with the luggage.

‘Of’ is used with certain adjectives however there is no real pattern and these must be learn as they are met. 
Afraid of, ashamed of, aware of, capable of, fond of, sure of, tired of. 
This is also true when ‘of’ is used with certain verbs: 
accuse (somebody) of, dream of, hear of, remind (somebody) of, think of

From

‘From’ is used to indicate where something originates ‘from’ 
Takashi is from Tokyo. This music is from the soundtrack of ‘Gone with the Wind’.

From – to or from – until

‘From’ is used with ‘to’ and ‘until’ to show the beginning and ending point of an action in time: 
I work from 8.30 am to 5.00pm every day. 
We will be in Paris from Monday until Thursday.

‘From’ is used with certain verbs like: 
borrow from, disappear from, discourage from, prevent from.

Lesson by Tristan, teacher at EC Malta English school

Now complete the following using ‘of’ or ‘from’:

  • 1. Sarah is really fond _ gardening.

    from
    of

  • 2. It was nice _ him to remember our anniversary.

    from
    of

  • 3. This quote is _ a play by Oscar Wilde

    from
    of

  • 4. Where is this wine _ ?

    of
    from

  • 5. The trees at the end of the garden protect us _ the wind.

    of
    from

  • 6. I smashed the side _ my car when I hit the tree.

    of
    from

  • 7. I was not aware _ the extra costs when I booked the cruise.

    from
    of

  • 8. He shouldn’t have shouted at Sarah. He should be ashamed _ what he did.

    from
    of

  • 9. I bought this shirt _ the new shop round the corner.

    from
    of

  • 10. I have a meeting _ nine to eleven this morning. I can meet you after that.

    of
    from

 

 

Confusing Words Grammar Vocabulary – There, Their and They’re

There, Their and They’re

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It is common for learners of English to confuse ‘there’, ‘their’ and ‘they’re’ especially since they all have the same sound when being pronounced. Here is an explanation of each one:

There

‘There’ has the opposite meaning of ‘here’. It is used to mean ‘not a place close to’ the speaker.
Have you seen mu glasses?
Yes, over ‘there’, on the table.

I’m driving to work. I’ll call you when I get ‘there’.

Put your coat ‘there’ on the hanger.

‘There is’, ‘there are’ are used to talk about something that is occurring or that exists somewhere else.
There is a traffic jam on the motorway.
There is a dog on your lawn.

Their

‘Their’ is a possessive adjective just like ‘my’, ‘your’ or ‘his/her/its’. It is used before a noun and means that something belongs to the people mentioned before.
John and Sarah have just moved to a house by the sea. That’s their house, next to the sushi restaurant.
Peter and David are very pleased with their exam results.

They’re

‘They’re’ is a contraction of ‘they are’. ‘They’ is the subject of the verb ‘to be’;They are = They’re
Did you like the roses?
They’re beautiful.

Peter and Tess are on their way here. They’re coming by car.

Complete the following with either ‘there’, ‘their’ or ‘they’re’:

  • 1. I’ll put my phone over _ on the desk.

    there
    their
    they’re

  • 2. Is _ a supermarket close to your house?

    there
    they’re
    their

  • 3. My brother and his wife are getting married. _ going to Thailand for the honeymoon.

    Their
    They’re
    There

  • 4. Tell the children to hurry. _ bus will be leaving soon.

    Their
    They’re
    There

  • 5. Where are the car keys? Over _ on the coffee table.

    there
    they’re
    their

  • 6. Why are John and David not speaking to each other? _ arguing again, aren’t they?

    Their
    They’re
    There

  • 7. The passengers were asked to switch off _ phones.

    there
    they’re
    their

  • 8. We can walk to the shops. _ not far.

    their
    They’re
    there

  • 9. I’m buying these shoes even though _ expensive.

    there
    they’re
    their

  • 10. Why are you sitting _ ? Come over here near the window.

    their
    they’re
    there

 

 

No one is in charge of your English, except you.

Take charge of your English

No one is in charge of your English, except you.

 

There is a “rule” in a list called: 7 Rules of Life

“No one is in charge of your happiness, except you.”

Which is so true.

But this “rule” can be adapted for you English learning:

No one is in charge of your English, except you.

It’s NOT

– your teacher

– your school

– your English book

– your job

– your family

 

Only you can decide to put an English habit into your life

Only you can do some English everyday:

– read; listen to the radio/podcast; watch English TV/DVD/Video; chat online etc etc

Confusing Words Vocabulary – So or neither

So or neither

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So and neither are used to show agreement or disagreement with a statement made by another person or concerning another person.

So

So is used to agree with a statement which is affirmative.
John: ‘I like pizza.’
Peter: ‘So do I.’

Here are some examples. Notice that if an auxiliary verb is used in the statement it matches in the agreeing reply.

A: I speak Russian. → B: So does David.
A: Peter is tired. → B: So is John.
A: Mark can play the saxophone. →B: So can Edward.
A: I’ve travelled a lot. → B: So have I.

Neither

Neither is used to agree with a negative statement:
Mark: ‘I don’t like classical music.’
Fred: ‘Neither do I.’

As with ‘so’ the auxiliary in the reply with ‘neither’ agrees with the statement:
A:  I don’t speak Russian. → B: Neither do I.
A: Peter isn’t happy. →B: Neither am I.
A: I can’t play any musical instruments. →B: Neither can I. 
A: I haven’t yet been to Paris. → B: Neither have I.

Neither or either

Compare these sentences:
A:  I don’t like broccoli. → B: Neither do I. – I don’t either.
‘not + either’ can be used instead of ‘neither’ with the same meaning.

Remember: The verb ‘hate’ has a negative meaning but it is used in an affirmative statement.
A: I hate broccoli. → B: So do I (hate broccoli) and NOT ‘Neither do I.’

Choose the correct reply to the following statement:

  • 1. John hates waking up early. (John hates it too) – 
    Neither does John.
    So does John.

  • 2. Peter arrived late for the meeting. (Mark also arrived late.) – 
    So did Mark.
    Neither did Mark.

  • 3. They couldn’t speak French. (We also couldn’t speak French) – 
    So could we.
    Neither could we.

  • 4. Too much tea is bad for you. (Coffee is also bad) – 
    Neither is coffee
    So is coffee.

  • 5. Sarah hates being late. (John also hates being late.) – 
    Neither does John.
    So does John.

  • 6. Mark has a very well paid job. (Peter also has a well paid job.) – 
    Neither does Peter.
    So does Peter.

  • 7. I’d love to live near the seas. (the next speaker agrees with the statement) – 
    Neither would I.
    so would I.

  • 8. John would hate life in the city. (Peter would also hate it) – 
    So would Peter.
    Neither would Peter.

  • 9. David just didn’t understand the new proposals. (Mark also didn’t understand) – 
    So did Mark.
    Mark didn’t either.

 

 

via Blogger http://jcsielts.blogspot.com/2013/09/confusing-words-vocabulary-so-or-neither.html

Confusing Words Vocabulary – So or neither

So or neither

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So and neither are used to show agreement or disagreement with a statement made by another person or concerning another person.

So

So is used to agree with a statement which is affirmative.
John: ‘I like pizza.’
Peter: ‘So do I.’

Here are some examples. Notice that if an auxiliary verb is used in the statement it matches in the agreeing reply.

A: I speak Russian. → B: So does David.
A: Peter is tired. → B: So is John.
A: Mark can play the saxophone. →B: So can Edward.
A: I’ve travelled a lot. → B: So have I.

Neither

Neither is used to agree with a negative statement:
Mark: ‘I don’t like classical music.’
Fred: ‘Neither do I.’

As with ‘so’ the auxiliary in the reply with ‘neither’ agrees with the statement:
A:  I don’t speak Russian. → B: Neither do I.
A: Peter isn’t happy. →B: Neither am I.
A: I can’t play any musical instruments. →B: Neither can I. 
A: I haven’t yet been to Paris. → B: Neither have I.

Neither or either

Compare these sentences:
A:  I don’t like broccoli. → B: Neither do I. – I don’t either.
‘not + either’ can be used instead of ‘neither’ with the same meaning.

Remember: The verb ‘hate’ has a negative meaning but it is used in an affirmative statement.
A: I hate broccoli. → B: So do I (hate broccoli) and NOT ‘Neither do I.’

Choose the correct reply to the following statement:

  • 1. John hates waking up early. (John hates it too) – 

    Neither does John.
    So does John.

  • 2. Peter arrived late for the meeting. (Mark also arrived late.) – 

    So did Mark.
    Neither did Mark.

  • 3. They couldn’t speak French. (We also couldn’t speak French) – 

    So could we.
    Neither could we.

  • 4. Too much tea is bad for you. (Coffee is also bad) – 

    Neither is coffee
    So is coffee.

  • 5. Sarah hates being late. (John also hates being late.) – 

    Neither does John.
    So does John.

  • 6. Mark has a very well paid job. (Peter also has a well paid job.) – 

    Neither does Peter.
    So does Peter.

  • 7. I’d love to live near the seas. (the next speaker agrees with the statement) – 

    Neither would I.
    so would I.

  • 8. John would hate life in the city. (Peter would also hate it) – 

    So would Peter.
    Neither would Peter.

  • 9. David just didn’t understand the new proposals. (Mark also didn’t understand) – 

    So did Mark.
    Mark didn’t either.

 

 

Confusing Words Vocabulary – Already, still, always and yet

Already, still, always and yet

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Already

Already is used to talk about something that has happened earlier than expected or earlier than it might/should have happened.

Don’t forget you need to send an e-mail to Chris.
Thanks for reminding me but I’ve already sent it.

Still

Still is used to refer to a situation that is continuing.

They’ve been together for fifty years and they are still madly in love.
As far as I know David is still working for the Daily Herald as a journalist.

Always

Always is used to talk about an action that happens regularly.

I always go skiing in December.
She always walks to work whether it’s good or bad weather.

Yet

Yet is used to ask if something expected has happened.

Have you been to Latin America yet?
Has Sarah phoned you yet?

Yet is also used to say that something expected hasn’t happened.

The clothes I bought on-line haven’t arrived yet.
Peter hasn’t yet arrived.

Lesson by Tristan, teacher at EC Malta English school

Now complete the following with ‘already’, ‘still’, ‘always’ or ‘yet’:

  • 1. Pedro moved to London five years ago and he _ lives there.

    still
    always
    already
    yet

  • 2. John _ goes to see his parents on Saturday.

    still
    already
    yet
    always

  • 3. What time did the electrician say he was coming? He’s _ here.

    still
    already
    always
    yet

  • 4. I haven’t _ received Peter’s e-mail about our trip to Japan.

    always
    always
    already
    yet

  • 5. Do you _ wear glasses?

    already
    always
    yet
    still

  • 6. I’ve been training really hard for a month now but I can’t _ see any progress.

    still
    always
    yet
    already

  • 7. Peter only started working at the office a month ago and he _ knows all his co-workers by name.

    always
    still
    already
    yet

  • 8. I _ make sure I’ve closed all the windows before I go out.

    always
    already
    still
    yet

  • 9. I’m waiting for my exam results. They haven’t arrived _ and it’s making me anxious.

    yet
    already
    still
    always

  • 10. The manager resigned last week but they haven’t announced it officially _.

    always
    still
    already
    yet